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  • Scientists Find Micro Plastic in Arctic Ice
    Global_warming__climate_change__scientists_find_micro_plastic_in_arctic_ice 2019-08-14 23:33:28 UTC
    LONDON (Reuters) - Tiny pieces of plastic have been found in ice cores drilled in the Arctic by a U.S.-led team of scientists, underscoring the threat the growing form of pollution poses to marine life in even the remotest waters on the planet. The researchers used a helicopter to land on ice floes and retrieve the samples during an 18-day icebreaker expedition through the Northwest Passage, the hazardous route linking the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. “We had spent weeks looking out at what looks so much like pristine white sea ice floating out on the ocean,” said Jacob Strock, a graduate student researcher at the University of Rhode...
  • Steve Jobs Design Chief to Start Own Firm
    Jony_ive-_steve_jobs_design_chief_to_start_own_firm 2019-06-28 00:58:11 UTC
    (Reuters) - Jony Ive, a close creative collaborator with Apple Inc co-founder Steve Jobs whose iPhone and other designs fueled Apple’s rise to become a $1 trillion company, will leave later this year to form an independent design company. Apple said Ive will continue work on its products at his new venture, but shares fell as much as 1.5% to $197.44 in after-market trading, wiping about $9 billion from the firm’s value. Ive spent nearly three decades at Apple, playing a leading role in the design of the candy-colored iMacs that helped Apple re-emerge from near death in the 1990s to the iPhone, regarded by many business experts as one...
  • Apple wants its login button above Google and Facebook
    Apple_wants_its_login_button_above_google_and_facebook 2019-06-05 05:23:38 UTC
    (Reuters) - Apple Inc will ask developers to position a new “Sign on with Apple” button in iPhone and iPad apps above rival buttons from Alphabet Inc’s Google and Facebook Inc, according to design guidelines released this week. The move to give Apple prime placement is significant because users often select the default or top option on apps. And Apple will require apps to offer its button if they want to offer options to login with Facebook or Google. Apple unveiled its login button on Monday, emphasizing users’ privacy and also introducing a feature that randomly generates an email address to avoid revealing the person’s true email....
  • Chinese Company to Sell Popular Dating App Grindr
    Chinese_company_to_sell_the_popular_dating_app_grindr 2019-03-27 17:54:06 UTC
    (Reuters) - Chinese gaming company Beijing Kunlun Tech Co Ltd is seeking to sell Grindr LLC, the popular gay dating app it has owned since 2016, after a U.S. government national security panel raised concerns about its ownership, according to people familiar with the matter. The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) has informed Kunlun that its ownership of West Hollywood, California-based Grindr constitutes a national security risk, the two sources said. CFIUS’ specific concerns and whether any attempt was made to mitigate them could not be learned. The United States has been increasingly scrutinizing app deve...
  • Scientists' evidence for man-made global warming hits 'gold standard'
    Alarming_research_finds_global_warming_is_accelerating_sea_level_rise 2019-02-25 18:33:18 UTC
    OSLO (Reuters) - Evidence for man-made global warming has reached a “gold standard” level of certainty, adding pressure for cuts in greenhouse gases to limit rising temperatures, scientists said on Monday. “Humanity cannot afford to ignore such clear signals,” the U.S.-led team wrote in the journal Nature Climate Change of satellite measurements of rising temperatures over the past 40 years. They said confidence that human activities were raising the heat at the Earth’s surface had reached a “five-sigma” level, a statistical gauge meaning there is only a one-in-a-million chance that the signal would appear if there was no warming. ...
  • China's Chang'e-4 Probe Touched Down on Far Side of Moon
    China's_chang'e-4_probe_touched_down_on_far_side_of_moon 2019-01-06 05:35:05 UTC
    China's Chang'e-4 probe touched down on the far side of the moon, state broadcaster CCTV reported on Thursday morning. The successful "soft landing" marks a groundbreaking development in space exploration, being the first time that a spacecraft has landed on the side of the moon that faces away from Earth. Chang'e-4, which is named after the Chinese goddess of the moon, entered its planned orbit to allow the landing on Sunday. It landed in the Von Karman crater, which is in the lunar South Pole's Aitken Basin, at about 0226 UTC. <strong>Lunar surface explorer</strong> Chang'e-4 is set to release a rover to map contours and surface...
  • Catastrophic Effects of Climate Change
    Catastrophic_effects_of_climate_change 2018-11-25 02:46:14 UTC
    (Reuters) - Climate change will cost the U.S. economy hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century, hitting everything from health to infrastructure, according to a government report issued on Friday that the White House called inaccurate. The congressionally mandated report, written with the help of more than a dozen U.S. government agencies and departments, outlined the projected impact of global warming on every corner of American society in a dire warning that is at odds with the Trump administration’s pro-fossil-fuels agenda. “With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic secto...
  • Parkinson's may get its start not in brain but in appendix
    Parkinson_may_get_its_start_not_in_brain_but_in_appendix 2018-10-31 21:29:40 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found a new clue that Parkinson’s disease may get its start not in the brain but in the gut — maybe in the appendix. People who had their appendix removed early in life had a lower risk of getting the tremor-inducing brain disease decades later, researchers reported Wednesday. Why? A peek at surgically removed appendix tissue shows this tiny organ, often considered useless, seems to be a storage depot for an abnormal protein — one that, if it somehow makes its way into the brain, becomes a hallmark of Parkinson’s. The big surprise, according to studies published in the journal Science Translationa...
  • European lawmakers vote to ban single-use plastics
    Eu_lawmakers_vote_to_ban_single-use_plastics 2018-10-25 19:15:10 UTC
    European lawmakers have approved measures to reduce plastics polluting seas and oceans. A proposed ban targets the top 10 single-use plastic products that litter Europe's beaches. The European Parliament on Wednesday approved measures that could lead to a ban on single-use plastic items, including straws, cotton swabs and disposable plastic plates and cutlery, by 2021. The parliament backed the proposals with a 571-53 majority. <blockquote> In May, the European Commission proposed EU-wide rules to target the top 10 single-use plastic items that litter Europe's beaches or are found in its seas, as well as lost and abandoned fishing gea...
  • Laser Trio Win Nobel Prize In Physics
    Laser_trio_win_nobel_prize_in_physics 2018-10-02 18:38:17 UTC
    STOCKHOLM/LONDON (Reuters) - A trio of American, French and Canadian scientists won the 2018 Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for breakthroughs in laser technology that have turned light beams into precision tools for everything from eye surgery to micro-machining. They include the first female physics prize winner in 55 years. Canada’s Donna Strickland, of the University of Waterloo, becomes only the third woman to win a Nobel for physics, after Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goeppert-Mayer in 1963. <blockquote><img alt="Nobel_prize_for_physics_2018_award_winners_(l-r)_arthur_ashkin_of_the_u.s.__gerard_mourou_of_france_and_donna...
  • Florence: US Facing the Challenges of Climate Change
    Florence-_us_facing_the_challenges_of_climate_change 2018-09-12 00:11:05 UTC
    Hurricane Florence is moving relentlessly toward the Southeastern U.S. It's a large, powerful cyclone that will likely bring storm surge and high winds to coastal communities. But climate scientists say one of the biggest threats posed by Florence is rain. "Freshwater flooding poses the greatest risk to life," explains James Kossin, an atmospheric scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. And Florence could cause extensive freshwater flooding for two reasons. First, Florence is moving slowly and could all but stop when it reaches land. "The storm could be over No...
  • Germany to end its reliance on 'cyber security' from US
    Germany_to_end_its_reliance_on_'cyber_security'_from_us 2018-08-30 00:21:47 UTC
    BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany announced a new agency on Wednesday to fund research on cyber security and to end its reliance on digital technologies from the United States, China and other countries. Interior Minister Horst Seehofer told reporters that Germany needed new tools to become a top player in cyber security and shore up European security and independence. “It is our joint goal for Germany to take a leading role in cyber security on an international level,” Seehofer told a news conference with Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen. “We have to acknowledge we’re lagging behind, and when one is lagging, one needs completely new a...
  • Trump’s ‘unmitigated crap’ on California wildfires
    Trump%e2%80%99s_%e2%80%98unmitigated_crap%e2%80%99_about_wildfires_ 2018-08-07 21:23:33 UTC
    U.S. President Donald Trump has weighed in on the California wildfires. But it wasn’t to express condolences for the victims or to praise the incredible bravery of firefighters — it was to try to score political points. And he did so by badly twisting the science of how wildfires work. In a now-deleted tweet, Trump blamed “bad environmental laws” for “diverting” water into the Pacific Ocean. Scientists mock Trump’s tweet on wildfires as ‘comedically ill-informed’ and ‘unmitigated crap.’ His climate denial is "a crime against the planet" warns climatologist. <blockquote><img alt="Trump_has_said_that_climate_change_is_a_hoax_%e...
  • Apple became the first $1 trillion listed US company
    Apple_became_the_first__1_trillion_publicly_listed_us_company 2018-08-02 18:06:54 UTC
    SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Apple became the first $1 trillion publicly listed U.S. company on Thursday, crowning a decade-long rise fueled by its ubiquitous iPhone that transformed it from a niche player in personal computers into a global powerhouse spanning entertainment and communications. The tech company’s stock jumped 2.8 percent to as high as $207.05, bringing its gain to about 9 percent since Tuesday when its reported June-quarter results above expectations and said it bought back $20 billion of its own shares. Started in the garage of co-founder Steve Jobs in 1976, Apple has pushed its revenue beyond the economic outputs of P...
  • Detection of water on Mars by italian scientists
    Detection_of_water_on_mars_by_italian_scientists 2018-07-25 22:26:02 UTC
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Using a radar instrument on an orbiting spacecraft, scientists have spotted what they said on Wednesday appears to be a sizable salt-laden lake under ice on the southern polar plain of Mars, a body of water they called a possible habitat for microbial life. The reservoir they detected — roughly 12 miles (20 km) in diameter, shaped like a rounded triangle and located about a mile (1.5 km) beneath the ice surface — represents the first stable body of liquid water ever found on Mars. <blockquote><img alt="Detection_of_water_on_mars_by_italian_scientists" src="/system/images/16480/original/Detection_of_water_on_Mar...
  • EU privacy law: Companies to be more attentive to user data
    Eu_privacy_law-_companies_to_be_more_attentive_to_customer_data 2018-05-25 06:40:19 UTC
    BRUSSELS (Reuters) - New European privacy regulations that go into effect on Friday will force companies to be more attentive to how they handle customer data, while bringing consumers both new ways to control their data and tougher enforcement of existing privacy rights. The European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaces the bloc’s patchwork of rules dating back to 1995 and heralds an era where breaking privacy laws can fetch fines of up to 4 percent of global revenue or 20 million euros ($23.48 million), whichever is higher, as opposed to a few hundred thousand euros. Many privacy advocates around the world have ...
  • Earth Hour: Millions of people turn off lights for nature
    Earth_hour-_cities_around_the_world_turn_off_lights_for_nature 2018-03-24 22:38:27 UTC
    Millions of people around the world are observing the annual Earth Hour to raise awareness about climate change. Dubai and Australia's Sydney Opera House were among the places to join the blackout. People around the world are turning off their lights for one hour on Saturday as part of the annual Earth Hour campaign, which aims to raise awareness about climate change caused by burning fossil fuels. <blockquote> <img alt="Italian_earth_hour_in_rome" src="/system/images/10491/original/Italian_Earth_Hour_in_Rome.jpg?1521931003" /><strong><i> Italian Earth Hour in Rome</i></strong><hr> The 11th edition of Earth Hour aims to build supp...
  • A Loss for All Humanity: Physicist Stephen Hawking Died
    Physicist_stephen_hawking_died_ 2018-03-14 08:27:15 UTC
    British physicist Stephen Hawking has died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 76, according to a family spokesperson. Known around the globe, he worked to make complicated scientific fields accessible to the public. Stephen Hawking, a renowned mathematician and physicist has died at the age of 76. "We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today. He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work and legacy will live on for many years. His courage and persistence with his brilliance and humor inspired people across the world," his three children said in a statement. <blockquote> Hawking died in his sle...
  • Study: Dying Polar Bear Connected to Global Warming
    Dying_polar_bear_is_connected_to_global_warming-_study 2018-02-04 05:42:12 UTC
    Millions have seen the heart-wrenching video of a polar bear clinging to life, its white hair limply covering its thin, bony frame. Shot by Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier of the nonprofit group Sea Legacy, and published on National Geographic in early December, the video ignited a firestorm of debate about what scientists know, and don’t know, about the impacts of global warming on polar bears. Without examining the bear in the video—thought to have died—it’s impossible to know for sure what ailed that individual, but now scientists have published new findings that shed more light on the risk to the species overall. <blockquo...
  • Homo sapiens trekked out of Africa far earlier than previously known
    Homo_sapiens_trekked_out_of_africa_far_earlier_than_previously_known 2018-01-25 21:32:55 UTC
    Homo sapiens were wandering out of Africa at least 177,000 years ago — some 60,000 years earlier than previously thought. The new migration date comes after ancient stone tools and part of a fossilised Homo sapiens jaw bone with teeth were discovered in a cave in northern Israel. Until now, the oldest evidence for modern humans outside Africa were only 90,000 to 120,000 years old. Homo sapiens first appeared in Africa, with the earliest-known fossils roughly 300,000 years old. A key milestone was when our species first ventured out of Africa en route to populating the far corners of the globe. <blockquote><img alt="Homo_sapiens...
  • iPhone overuse could hurt children’s developing brains
    Iphone_overuse_could_hurt_children%e2%80%99s_developing_brains 2018-01-09 04:39:42 UTC
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Apple Inc investors are shrugging off concerns raised by two shareholders about kids getting hooked on iPhones, saying that for now a little addiction might not be a bad thing for profits. Hedge fund JANA Partners LLC and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) pension fund said on Saturday that iPhone overuse could be hurting children’s developing brains, an issue that may harm the company’s long-term market value. <blockquote><img alt="Iphone_overuse_could_hurt_children%e2%80%99s_developing_brains" src="/system/images/16642/original/iPhone_overuse_could_hurt_children%E2%80%99s_developing_brai...
  • Highly-skilled foreign workers favor Canada, not the U.S.
    Highly-skilled_foreign_workers_favor_canada__not_u.s 2017-12-18 03:45:11 UTC
    Petra Axolotl knew her chances of getting an H-1B visa were slim. She had an MBA from Wharton and a job offer at Twitter, but luck would decide the Dutch data scientist's fate – and in 2016, it did not fall in her Favor. Axolotl missed out in the lottery for the coveted visa but remained determined to work in Silicon Valley, a place she considered the global capital of tech innovation. The plan was to reapply this year. Then Donald Trump became president, and she prepared to move somewhere else – Canada. Unlike many liberal-leaning technology workers in Silicon Valley, Axolotl doesn't consider herself "anti-Trump." But the new a...
  • The Next GOOGLE Could Come From Europe
    Next_google_could_come_from_europe 2017-11-30 06:38:48 UTC
    LONDON (Reuters) - Europe is making major strides to eliminate barriers that have held back the region from developing tech firms that can compete on the scale of global giants Alphabet Inc’s Google, Amazon.com Inc or Tencent Holdings Inc, a report published on Thursday shows. The region has thriving tech hubs in major cities, with record new funding, experienced entrepreneurs, a growing base of technical talent and an improving regulatory climate, according to a study by European venture firm Atomico. While even the largest European tech ventures remain a fraction of the size of the biggest U.S. and Asian rivals, global music stream...
  • What happens to your body when it's donated to science
    Lucrative_business_with_donated_bodies_of_americans_to_science 2017-10-24 20:19:03 UTC
    When Americans leave their bodies to science, they are also donating to commerce: Cadavers and body parts, especially those of the poor, are sold in a thriving and largely unregulated market. Since it's not regulated by a federal agency, there's no official number, but it is estimated about 20,000 bodies per year are donated to medical schools around the U.S., according to the Harvard Business School. Frequently asked questions: Is it really legal to sell bodies? <blockquote>LAS VEGAS – The company stacked brochures in funeral parlors around Sin City. On the cover: a couple clasping hands. Above the image, a promise: “Providing ...
  • Scientists Detect Light From Gravitational Wave
    Scientists_detect_light_from_gravitational_wave_when_neutron_stars_collide 2017-10-16 19:27:03 UTC
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Reuters) - When neutron stars collide: Scientists in Europe and the U.S. have for the first time detected gravitational waves, the ripples in space and time predicted by Albert Einstein, at the same time as light from the same cosmic event, according to research published on Monday. The waves, caused by the collision of two neutron stars some 130 million years ago, were first detected in August by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatories, known as LIGO, in Washington state and Louisiana as well as at a third detector, named Virgo, in Italy. <blockquote>Two seconds later, observatories across earth a...